Adam Marelli Photo http://www.adammarelliphoto.com Now Boarding Leica Air . . . Mon, 29 Jun 2015 17:24:53 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.6.1 Photographer at Large: Indrajit Khambe http://www.adammarelliphoto.com/2015/06/photographer-at-large-indrajit-khambe/ http://www.adammarelliphoto.com/2015/06/photographer-at-large-indrajit-khambe/#comments Mon, 29 Jun 2015 17:22:08 +0000 adam http://www.adammarelliphoto.com/?p=7571 [more...]]]> Photographer at Large: Indrajit Khambe

How to shoot an emotional moment

 

© Indrajit Khambe

© Indrajit Khambe

Adam’s Note

How much distance can we put between the camera and our subject?  Is it a matter that can be measured in feet and meters or is the distance an invisible emotion that ties us to a moment?

When Indrajit, a reader of the site, contacted me, his email brought up a touching point.  His wife had just been through a stressful ordeal with the birth of their second child.  The premature delivery came with a number of risks.  It was an emotional time for them both.  But in spite of the situation, Indrajit felt compelled to capture this intense moment for his family.  There is no clear line where the photographer end and the participant begins.  It is something that everyone must work out for themselves.  Ask yourself, how close or how far do you feel from the pictures you make?

© Indrajit Khambe © Indrajit Khambe © Indrajit Khambe © Indrajit Khambe © Indrajit Khambe © Indrajit Khambe

Pre-Mature

by Indrajit Khambe

I live in very small town in India, which has a population of about 40,000.  It might not be the tiniest village, but for an Indian city it is on the small side.  Since 2002 I’ve run computer repair shop.  Photography is not my profession, but it is not a passion.  In 2012 I first picked up a camera. Once the internet availability came in to my town, I started studying various photographers from the history. But one photographer who struck me emotionally was Josef Koudelka. I loved his work a lot and it felt relevant when we were about to have our second child.

© Indrajit Khambe

© Indrajit Khambe

We got news at end of July that my wife is pregnant second time. The doctors gave us a delivery date around first week of April. Everything was all right until December 14th.  Then in first week of January a scan reported sudden lyker drop in a womb.  Doctors suggested two options. One is delivering 7 months pre-matured baby or Amnioinfusion (depositing lyker externally in the womb) treatment. But during this treatment there was a risk of disturbing the fetus. After long debate, we decided to take a risk and go for second option so baby can get a time to grow in mother’s womb. We did this process until the first week of February.  After a week the scan reported another lyker drop. So we repeated the same process around 12th feb. and again on 22nd of Feb. Then on 3rd of March scan reported lyker totally drained.  The doctor took a decision of emergency caesarean on 3rd of March. We blessed with quite a healthy weight (2.4 K.G.) baby.  The baby was 5 weeks premature. But when pediatrician examined baby they were quite happy with the healthy symptoms of baby and said there is no need of taking baby in to NICU.

© Indrajit Khambe

© Indrajit Khambe

My daughter Saee drew a sketch imagining that she is playing in a garden with her upcoming sister of brother. © Indrajit Khambe

My daughter Saee drew a sketch imagining that she is playing in a garden with her upcoming sister of brother. © Indrajit Khambe

My daughter Saee spending her time dancing on a song performed on the TV show. © Indrajit Khambe

My daughter Saee spending her time dancing on a song performed on the TV show. © Indrajit Khambe

© Indrajit Khambe

© Indrajit Khambe

In this process I spent around twenty five days in hospital with my wife and 4 year old daughter. Most of the time I managed things like medicines and food etc. No one from my family was available to help at hospital. So I squeezed in shooting when I could, even though I was juggling my four year old daughter at the same time.  I captured the best possible movements of our lives around those days. Sometime it was hard to capture some intense moments because I failed to detach me emotionally from watching my wife’s pain. But I tried my best.  In the end, I will allow the pictures to speak for themselves.

© Indrajit Khambe

© Indrajit Khambe

Emergency caesarean taking place in operation theater © Indrajit Khambe

Emergency caesarean taking place in operation theater © Indrajit Khambe

© Indrajit Khambe

© Indrajit Khambe

Nurse brought Seema out from OT after completion of operation. Seema is still under a effect of anesthesia © Indrajit Khambe

Nurse brought Seema out from OT after completion of operation. Seema is still under a effect of anesthesia © Indrajit Khambe

The baby is one month premature, nurse holding a oxygen mask which help baby to take a breath in external environment. Hence the baby is one month premature, nurse holding a oxygen mask which help baby to take a breath in external environment. © Indrajit Khmambe

The baby is one month premature, nurse holding a oxygen mask which help baby to take a breath in external environment. Hence the baby is one month premature, nurse holding a oxygen mask which help baby to take a breath in external environment. © Indrajit Khambe

© Indrajit Khambe © Indrajit Khambe © Indrajit Khambe © Indrajit Khambe
Baby boy holding his sister hand.  And the relationship continues. © Indrajit Khambe

Baby boy holding his sister hand. And the relationship continues. © Indrajit Khambe

 

 

]]>
http://www.adammarelliphoto.com/2015/06/photographer-at-large-indrajit-khambe/feed/ 4
Workshop Shoot: Galleria Romanelli, Florence Italy http://www.adammarelliphoto.com/2015/06/workshop-shoot-galleria-romanelli-florence-italy/ http://www.adammarelliphoto.com/2015/06/workshop-shoot-galleria-romanelli-florence-italy/#comments Thu, 04 Jun 2015 20:49:54 +0000 adam http://www.adammarelliphoto.com/?p=7540 [more...]]]> Workshop Shoot: Galleria Romanelli, Florence / Italy

A .  M A R E L L I  W o r k s h o p  J o u r n a l

Galleria Romanelli © Adam Marelli

Galleria Romanelli © Adam Marelli

Rivers divide cities.  The division is pretty simple.  The guys in charge live on one side and the guys who work, live on the other.  The two groups are dependent on one another, but historically, prefer not to mix.  Nowadays the “working class” neighborhoods of any city are the most stylish places to live.  Lofts, warehouses, converted factories replaced the grand homes of the past as the cool places to live.

Galleria Romanelli © Adam Marelli

Galleria Romanelli © Adam Marelli

Galleria Romanelli © Adam Marelli

Galleria Romanelli © Adam Marelli

This urban formula can be found all over Europe…London, Budapest, Paris, Venice and yes, Florence.  The Oltrarno neighborhood got its name by literally meaning “the other side of the Arno.”  Home to many Florentine craftsmen, it has a real neighborhood feel, only a stone’s throw away from the madness of the Ponte Vecchio.  The food is cheaper, the feeling is more authentic, and you might meet an actual Florentine.

Galleria Romanelli © Adam Marelli

Galleria Romanelli © Adam Marelli

If you ever want to get a feel for a city, take a map and find the biggest tourist attraction in the place.  From that point, burn a hole in the map about a 1/2 mile around.  What you are left with are the places you want to visit.  What you burned away will be good for about 30 minutes in the morning, but will be mobbed for the rest of the day.  Better to see it in the off season.  If it is as tragic at New York’s Times Square, skip it all together.  Getting to know a city is not a matter of luck, but a deliberate act of avoiding tourist traps.  They will swallow you up like an “All-you-can eat Vegas buffet.”

Galleria Romanelli © Adam Marelli

Galleria Romanelli © Adam Marelli

Galleria Romanelli © Adam Marelli

Galleria Romanelli © Adam Marelli

On the first day of the workshop we were invited to photograph a unique studio in the Oltrarno.  Galleria Romanelli is a sculpture studio founded in the late 1800’s by Lorenzo Bartolini.  The building is a converted church from the 15th century.  Inside they produced everything from table top clay busts to full scale equestrian statues.

Galleria Romanelli © Adam Marelli

Galleria Romanelli © Adam Marelli

Today, the two Romanelli brothers still run the place.  They each have a specialty.  Raffaello focuses on humans, where his brother sculpts animals.  The tag team duo is equipped to produce almost anything their clients can throw at them.  We spent a few hours inside with Raffaello looking through the vast archive…how vast?  Well, with a studio that was a former church, the ceilings are just shy of 50 feet tall.  The equestrian sculpture with mounted figure looked like a G.I. Joe on the floor.  The scale was staggering.

Galleria Romanelli © Adam Marelli

Galleria Romanelli © Adam Marelli

Galleria Romanelli © Adam Marelli

Galleria Romanelli © Adam Marelli

When you combine this scale with the diversity of marble, bronze, and plaster pieces, we had the DNA of Florentine sculpture laid out before us.  Whether you wanted a piece of the David, a bust of Dante, or studies from Roman sculptor Bernini, Galleria Romanelli was a fountain of spectacular options.

Galleria Romanelli © Adam Marelli

Galleria Romanelli © Adam Marelli

Galleria Romanelli © Adam Marelli

Galleria Romanelli © Adam Marelli

The photographers were given a chance to practice art techniques they learned earlier that day, without the rush and hustle of the streets.  It was the closest thing to a “perfect training ground,” to develop their own skills.  They had a chance to photograph Raffaello at work with one of his students, architecture, and a stock pile of sculptures blessed with incredible light.

Galleria Romanelli © Adam Marelli

Galleria Romanelli © Adam Marelli

Galleria Romanelli © Adam Marelli

Galleria Romanelli © Adam Marelli

DESIGN YOUR OWN WORKSHOP

If you could photograph any workshop in the world, we would like to hear in the comment section below:

  1. What would you like to shoot?
  2. And where would you like to go?

 

SPECIAL THANK YOU
During the Florence Workshop I shot a Leica M240, compliments of Photo Village here in NYC.

Upcoming Workshops:

Galleria Romanelli © Adam Marelli

Galleria Romanelli © Adam Marelli

AM_LOGO-Lightroom-Small

 

 

 

]]>
http://www.adammarelliphoto.com/2015/06/workshop-shoot-galleria-romanelli-florence-italy/feed/ 4
Salt of the Earth: Sebastiao Salgado http://www.adammarelliphoto.com/2015/06/salt-of-the-earth-sebastiao-salgado/ http://www.adammarelliphoto.com/2015/06/salt-of-the-earth-sebastiao-salgado/#comments Mon, 01 Jun 2015 20:19:26 +0000 adam http://www.adammarelliphoto.com/?p=7513 [more...]]]> Salt of the Earth: Sebastiao Salgado

A  f i l m  f o r  p h o t o g r a p h e r s

This weekend, a good friend recommended I watch “Salt of the Earth.”  The new documentary by Wim Wenders chronicles thirty years of Sebastiao Salgado’s work, life, and accomplishments.  While there are endless stories about famous photographers, there are not many films made about their lives.  The stories that make it to the big screen, like the Bang-Bang Club or a tragic adaptation that includes Robert Capa called “Hemingway and Gellhorn,” tend to get it all wrong.  They play up the cheesy parts, ignore the interesting parts, and never get into the heart of “Why we make pictures?”  

Sebastiao Salgado in the Sahel

Sebastiao Salgado in the Sahel

Wender’s project gets it all right.  He provides a look behind the lens and in front of the camera, of Salgado, as he works on massive projects like Workers, The Sahel, or recently Genesis.  It becomes apparent that while Genesis seems like a project of biblical proportions, almost all of Salgado’s works are large in scale.  The film adds a timeline to Salgado’s approach that is hard to understand when you pick up his books.  By tracing his roots as an economist, the film de-mystifies the motivation behind making the images, without removing the excitement  we experience when viewing them.

This was the image that inspired Wim Wender's to produce a film on Sebastiao Salgado.

This was the image that inspired Wim Wenders to produce a film on Sebastiao Salgado.

And further on the plus side, the film is interesting enough that you can watch it with someone who does not care about f-stops or dynamic range.  It is a carefully constructed story that illuminates three points that never receive enough attention in the photography world:

1.  Sebastiao Salgado has a clear point of view that is reflected in his images.

2.  The projects, while receiving plenty of news coverage, were not conceived as “news pieces.”  These projects took years to complete.

3.  When Salgado realized that “bringing exposure to events through pictures” was not enough, he did something about it.  His Instituto Terra showed how a strategic approach actually effects change and pictures make the topics more engaging with people who would otherwise be too busy to care.

Wim Wenders and Sebastiao Salgado reviewing Salgado's work.

Wim Wenders and Sebastiao Salgado reviewing Salgado’s work.

“Salt of the Earth” is playing at select independent theaters, but will be on iTunes or Netflix soon.  Check it out and let us know what you think of the film, Salgado and the pictures.

Sebastiao Salgado © Carlos Bertoni (an alumni of the A. MARELLI Workshops in Prague and Berlin)

Sebastiao Salgado © Carlos Bertoni (an alumni of the A. MARELLI Workshops in Prague and Berlin)

AM_LOGO-Lightroom-Small

 

]]>
http://www.adammarelliphoto.com/2015/06/salt-of-the-earth-sebastiao-salgado/feed/ 4
The Bell Tower: Florence, Italy http://www.adammarelliphoto.com/2015/05/the-bell-tower-florence-italy/ http://www.adammarelliphoto.com/2015/05/the-bell-tower-florence-italy/#comments Thu, 28 May 2015 20:08:40 +0000 adam http://www.adammarelliphoto.com/?p=7480 [more...]]]> The Bell Tower: From Florence to Chianti

A .  M A R E L L I  W o r k s h o p  J o u r n a l

A. Marelli Workshop Journal (Florence) © Adam Marelli

A. Marelli Workshop Journal (Florence) © Adam Marelli

Day Two in Florence started as every day should, with coffee and pastry on a terrace.  The wrap around terrace at Palazzo Guadagni makes me feel like I want to cut a hole in my apartment in New York and tack on a dozen columns and a roof to view the neighborhood.  It is one of the details that settles you into a city.  From this view, the towers of Cheisa di Santo Spirito and the top of Chiesa di Santa Maria Novella catch the first light of the sunrise.  For all the complaints that can be made about Italy, Florence still has the hierarchy of buildings in the right order.  Their resistance to put up glass and steel boxes is like urban therapy for the soul.  A few days on that terrace will iron out feelings you never even knew you had.  I look forward to it every year and am already looking forward to our return.

A. Marelli Workshop Journal (Florence) © Adam Marelli

A. Marelli Workshop Journal (Florence) © Adam Marelli

After breakfast and a shower, I start to feel human again.  The full day of travel which got us here always leaves a residue that requires a shower and a good night’s sleep.  Today we were off to meet a friend, Miniato Maria.  He is a young monk that I met last year.  This afternoon we were invited to the Gregorian chant in the crypt of the church.  No photography is allowed and honestly, the sound is so incredible, why bother with pictures?  Some things are better felt than photographed.

A. Marelli Workshop Journal (Florence) © Adam Marelli

A. Marelli Workshop Journal (Florence) © Adam Marelli

The walk up to San Miniato is long.  I joke that there are 10,000 steps from the bottom of the Arno River to the top of the mountain.  In reality it might be shorter, but the steep grade and ancient stairs are not for the faint of heart.  Even with my regular work out routine, we decide to take a taxi and opt for the walk “down” instead.  When we arrive, the dark doorway welcomes us to blackness inside.  It takes a few moments for our eyes to adjust.

A. Marelli Workshop Journal (Florence) © Adam Marelli

A. Marelli Workshop Journal (Florence) © Adam Marelli

Located in the back of the church, down a flight of stairs, is the crypt.  Its multiple columns and candle lit atmosphere feel like a cross between an M.C. Escher drawing and a Stanley Kubrick film.  When the monks file in through a side door, you are not quite sure what to expect.  It is a strange sensation because it’s really just twelve guys coming in to sing a few songs, but the combination of the crypt, the robes, the somber feeling and the candles gives it that much more power.  If they did this in a sunlit pavilion, it would be much less intense, but I am glad there is a bit of drama behind it all.

A. Marelli Workshop Journal (Florence) © Adam Marelli

A. Marelli Workshop Journal (Florence) © Adam Marelli

If you have never seen monks chanting, I’d highly recommend it.  I’ve had the opportunity to experience (and participate) in chanting with Christian monks, Brahmin priests, and Zen monks.  They are all outstanding experiences that immerse you into another world.  Not everyone will have the time or luxury to be able to live in a monastery but, if you have a few spare hours, a chanting session will give you a little taste.

A. Marelli Workshop Journal (Florence) © Adam Marelli

A. Marelli Workshop Journal (Florence) © Adam Marelli

Without any warning, the chanting begins.  Not two minutes in and someone has forgotten to turn off their iPhone.  Gotta love this woman, as she makes almost as much noise as the chanting, searching all twenty six pockets of her backpack as her phone rings.  Note to self, silence the phone prior to entering the church.  After this little reminder that technology is always with us, the chanting continues for forty minutes.

A. Marelli Workshop Journal (Florence) © Adam Marelli

A. Marelli Workshop Journal (Florence) © Adam Marelli

Once the monks finish, the candles are extinguished and they file out one by one.  The last monk closes the heavy metal door and locks it with a thud that sounds medieval.  It’s a dramatic close to the afternoon.  A few minutes later, Miniato Maria comes out to greet Stacy and I.  Five minutes ago he was sober as could be, but now he is all smiles.  It’s great to see friendly faces abroad.  He wanted to show us around to a few of the spots which are closed to the public.  Kindly, he reminds me that I am allowed to take whatever pictures I would like, or I can come back later to shoot.

A. Marelli Workshop Journal (Florence) © Adam Marelli

A. Marelli Workshop Journal (Florence) © Adam Marelli

Together we pass the velvet ropes which divide the public and private spaces, walk through a door under the organ, and make our way to a tiny, pitch black staircase.  He suggests we use our phones for light.  There are small windows cut through the thick walls.  They illuminate a few steps in the spiral and then it goes black again.  It’s impossible to tell how many turns we made, but eventually we are at the top of the bell tower.  Just above our heads is a bell that is at least 2 meters in diameter.  My first thought is, “If this bell rings, we are going to be deaf for a few hours.”

A. Marelli Workshop Journal (Florence) © Adam Marelli

A. Marelli Workshop Journal (Florence) © Adam Marelli

Miniato Maria said that it’s not scheduled to ring for another ten minutes so we are ok to check it out.  This bell is large enough that it has been automated.  Across the valley, on the other side of Florence, is one of their sister monasteries.  Those bells need to be rung by a rope.  And as the pecking order of the brothers would dictate, the young guys have to do the dirty work.  Miniato Maria and one of the other monks scamper across broken roof tiles, only to tie themselves to the tower, before ringing the bells.  The fear is that they will slip as they tug on the rope, and the roof has no guardrails.  He laughs it all off as a challenge for the “new kids.” 

A. Marelli Workshop Journal (Florence) © Adam Marelli

A. Marelli Workshop Journal (Florence) © Adam Marelli

One level up from the bell is the tower roof.  It is the single highest point in Florence.  On one side is Florence and the roof top of every architectural achievement from the Renaissance to today and on the other side is Chianti.  Famous for their wines, the region boasts an absurd skyline of another kind.  In the distance, Chianti looks like a labyrinth of castles and gardens.  The only thing missing is a cave where a few dragons might emerge.

A. Marelli Workshop Journal (Florence) © Adam Marelli

A. Marelli Workshop Journal (Florence) © Adam Marelli

We hang out on the tower and finally get a chance to catch up.  Miniato Maria is on FB and Instagram, so we keep an eye on each other, but it’s always better to hear how things are face to face.  Eventually, there is a moment where I sit back, look at the sunset and realize how incredible and rare this moment really is.  Stacy is chatting away with Miniato Maria…and here I am thinking, “I’m on the top of a tower, over looking a city, all virtually unchanged in five hundred years, in no hurry to move, and casually chatting like I was at a cafe in NYC.”  This is why I love traveling.

A. Marelli Workshop Journal (Florence) © Adam Marelli

A. Marelli Workshop Journal (Florence) © Adam Marelli

Sure there are luxuries that anyone can settle into…and don’t get me wrong, I love first class just as much as the next person.  But the things that really set one trip apart from the next are the unique, human experiences that solidify a feeling and suspend the sense of “what we know” in light of what we are doing at that moment.  It could all be an exercise of living in the present, which is easier said than done.  Though how often do our heads wander somewhere else? On this day, on that tower, with Miniato Maria and my girlfriend, it all came together.  What I did not know was that this evening set the tone for what was going to be an amazing two weeks and two workshops in Florence and Matera.

On Monday, we will be back with the start of the workshop and how a lucky email turned into an amazing shoot.

SPECIAL THANK YOU
During both workshops I was using a Leica M240, compliments of Photo Village here in NYC.

Berlin Photo Workshop with Leica Store Miami and Adam Marelli

Berlin Photo Workshop with Leica Store Miami and Adam Marelli

Upcoming Workshops:

A. Marelli Workshop Journal (Florence) © Adam Marelli

A. Marelli Workshop Journal (Florence) © Adam Marelli

AM_LOGO-Lightroom-Small

]]>
http://www.adammarelliphoto.com/2015/05/the-bell-tower-florence-italy/feed/ 0
The Arrival: Florence, Italy http://www.adammarelliphoto.com/2015/05/the-arrival-florence-italy/ http://www.adammarelliphoto.com/2015/05/the-arrival-florence-italy/#comments Mon, 25 May 2015 16:18:04 +0000 adam http://www.adammarelliphoto.com/?p=7463 [more...]]]> The Arrival: Florence, Italy

A.  M A R E L L I  W o r k s h o p  J o u r n a l

 

Ponte Vecchio © Adam Marelli

Ponte Vecchio © Adam Marelli

Springtime in New York means the start of travel season.  The international workshops start once the winter winds and early spring rains come to a close.  With summer on the horizon we packed our bags.  We left for Italy and the start of a two week journey south under perfect conditions.

As always, the days before flying out are super busy.  You know how this goes, right?  Once the tickets are purchased the to-do list gets an extra burst.  It is non-stop deadlines, meetings that “have to happen,” and all the things you thought could be postponed magically need to happen before you leave.  This trip was no different.  Added to the mix were the much anticipated Slow Tools Collaboration Bags, which arrived a few days prior to departure (and we are happy to report all sold out.)

Florentie Fuel © Adam Marelli

Florentine Fuel © Adam Marelli

Fast forward a few hours and I am comfortably asleep on the airplane.  All is still, headphones are on, and I slip into a restful slumber.  When my phone starts buzzing, I wake up confused.  We are supposed to be in the air, but United just sent an update that the flight is delayed 30 min.  Then it is another 30 min.  Following a two hour tarmac delay, the captain finally says, “If you would like to get off the plane and stretch your legs, please be sure to take all of your things with you.”  It seems like we are going to be stateside for a while longer.  Fortunately we have a 5 hour layover in Brussels enroute to Florence, so the delay is less concerning for us.  Eventually, the engines power up and the familiar lift of the jet separates us from the US and brings us to Europe.

People often ask, “What do you do when you get to a city? Do you shoot the first day? What is the most exciting thing about arriving?”  They are all good questions because they set the tone for how I like to travel.

Stacy Double Fisting Gelato © Adam Marelli

Stacy Double Fisting Gelato © Adam Marelli

The first thing that strikes us, no matter where we fly, is the smell when we step outside of the airport.  It is usually a combination of taxi fumes and the scent of charred rubber that hits first.  By all accounts it should be a terrible smell, but it is invigorating.  Our other four senses, smell, touch, sound, and taste take over well before the camera is out of the bag.

This year, we noticed that Florence instituted a flat rate into the city.  That’s right, no questionable meters or run around scams, often encountered in other parts.  Not that I have been ripped off by taxi drivers in Italy before, but it’s nice to see a level of regulation upon arrival.  If there is one thing that city officials, especially in NYC, fail to understand, it’s that the airport taxi is your first point of contact.  They are the accidental ambassadors of your city.  Are they kind, gentle, helpful?  Or are they hurried, impatient crooks hellbent on extracting a few extra coins from tired travelers?

Drummers Santa Maria Novella © Adam Marelli

Drummers Santa Maria Novella © Adam Marelli

With a three hour delay and eight hours of flight time, my brain was a little mushy.  Like a cow lost from the herd, I was corralled down the sidewalk.  Suddenly it all came back to me.  My senses kicked in and we were off.  The driver said there was some rain expected this afternoon, but that the weather was going to turn for the better.

Twenty minutes later we pulled up to the small piazza of Santo Spirito.  Located on the Oltrarno, away from the hoards descending on the Uffizi, we have arrived.  The door of Palazzo Guadagni, where we are staying, is monumental.  Like a wooden version of the Pantheon, it has a small piston that pulls the door open.  Martina, just as we left her last year, buzzes us in.  My girlfriend takes the elevator, with all the luggage, to the top floor.  The elevator is no bigger than a closet.  There is enough room for her and our bags.  I opt for the walk up.  The stretch will do me some good.

Ceiling at Farmacia Santa Maria Novella © Adam Marelli

Ceiling at Farmacia Santa Maria Novella © Adam Marelli

On the top floor we are welcomed with the familiar hospitality known to those who return each year.  Martina says No.12, our room from last year, is just as we left it.  The large window faces a quiet courtyard, which is much appreciated at night.  Piazza Santo Spirito can get lively in the evening.  But on our side of the hotel the only sound comes from the morning classes held at the Italian school downstairs.

We set down our luggage, shower off, and get to the most essential of Italian fuels, coffee.  After a strong “caffe normale”, the first order of business in Florence is a trip to Santa Maria Novella.  In case you are wondering, no we are not devout catholics on a pilgrimage.  I endured enough catholic school to never want to sit in another Mass for the rest of my life.

Flag Procession © Adam Marelli

Flag Procession © Adam Marelli

Aside from being one of the most famous piazzas and churches in Florence, Farmacia Santa Maria Novella is a producer of some of the finest soaps, perfumes, and apothecary needs in the world.  Founded by Benedictine monks in the 13th century, their boutique is out of this world.  The vaulted ceilings and frescos put just about any other attempt at “an exceptional retail experience,” to shame.

Even if you are not into their goods, a trip to the shop and its many rooms or the cafe that overlooks the cloisters is well worth it.  Today, we pick up some soap.  Since we will be in Florence for a week, followed by Matera for a week, two bars of soap will do.  We find the combination of hotel soap and Tuscan water make you feel like a sun dried tomato.

We opt for the patchouli and the tobacco toscano flavors.  With everything paid for, we wander outside to grab a gelato and run into a procession of drummers practicing for the upcoming June activities.  We snap a few iPhone shots of the period-dressed Florentines and then retreat to the safety of the Oltrarno.  Tomorrow we will pull out the camera for the first time and visit with our friendly monk Miniato Maria, who we discussed in the Unfinished Business article.

Upcoming Workshops:

Miniato Maria and Stacy Berman © Adam Marelli

Miniato Maria and Stacy Berman © Adam Marelli

 

 

 

]]>
http://www.adammarelliphoto.com/2015/05/the-arrival-florence-italy/feed/ 2
Berlin Photo Workshop: Leica Store Miami + Adam Marelli http://www.adammarelliphoto.com/2015/04/berlin-photo-workshop-leica-store-miami-adam-marelli/ http://www.adammarelliphoto.com/2015/04/berlin-photo-workshop-leica-store-miami-adam-marelli/#comments Fri, 24 Apr 2015 15:58:20 +0000 adam http://www.adammarelliphoto.com/?p=7439 [more...]]]> Berlin Photo Workshop with Leica Store Miami and Adam Marelli

Berlin Photo Workshop with Leica Store Miami and Adam Marelli

Berlin Photo Workshop

Leica Store Miami + Adam Marelli

U P D A T E

After our successful workshops in Prague and Florence, Leica Store MiamiAdam Marelli Workshops wanted to keep the European adventures rolling. This summer we will be heading to Germany’s capital city of Berlin.

Berlin is a laid back city with a friendly population that is home to world-class art, music and culture. Past and present come together in this diverse city, resulting in a bohemian vibe that makes Berlin a magnet for creativity. It is the perfect location to hone your photography skills. Whether we are chasing down a game of bocce ball along the river or shooting a model on location, Berlin is a brilliant backdrop offering a range of settings from classical architecture to the grittier relics of the post-war years.

In this four day workshop we will explore the city as backdrop, muse and your own personal photographic studio. Together, we will discover the connection between photography, art and the vibrant culture of Berlin. You will learn how to apply this holistic approach to your personal vision anywhere in the world.

Kreuzberg, Berlin © Adam Marelli

Fun along the canals in Kreuzberg, Berlin © Adam Marelli

Berlin 5 © Adam Marelli

Photographers aren’t the only ones who fondle their equipment.  © Adam Marelli

What’s included

  • Four days of guided shooting around our favorite locations in Berlin
  • A private shoot in a local artisan’s studio
  • A session with professional models with one-on-one instruction on environmental portraiture
  • Composition and lighting presentations by Adam Marelli that have been featured on B&H Photo Series, Petapixel, Art Photo Feature, and the Leica Blog
  • Technical workflow instruction for Adobe Lightroom from Leica expert David Farkas, who has 25 years experience in professional digital imaging and printing
  • Large selection of Leica cameras and lenses to use for the duration of workshop, including M (Typ 240), M Monochrom and legendary lenses like the 50mm Noctilux and the 50mm APO-Summicron
Last year we dropped into a graphic designer and photographers studio in Berlin © Adam Marelli

Last year we dropped into a graphic designer and photographers studio in Berlin © Adam Marelli

Adam’s Approach

Adam’s approach to photo instruction is very different from the usual photo workshop. His foundation as a painter, sculptor and craftsman add tremendously to his photography experience and his ability to teach classical composition and lighting techniques. In the one-on-one critique sessions, Adam is direct, honest and extremely constructive (and sometimes downright hilarious), getting participants to reach a new level of self-awareness in their photography. By the end of the workshop, you’ll find yourself hearing his critiques in your head as you frame prospective images. As a result, in just four days you’ll approach composition and image making from a new perspective and find yourself able to easily identify your strongest photos, while avoiding past mistakes.

Of course, you might also find yourself learning more than you ever thought possible about art and artists, as Adam has been known to bring to bear his encyclopedic knowledge of art history when discussing photography. We might even find ourselves taking a short break from photography, visiting a museum or gallery where Adam will walk us through some of the pieces. This is not your typical photo workshop.

For more information and to register, click here. If you have any questions, please contact us at
(305) 921-4433 or info@leicastoremiami.com

T E S T I M O N I A L 

First, I just want to say how much I enjoyed meeting you and Stacy and spending time with you in Berlin.  It was a fun, challenging, intellectually stimulating, and eye opening weekend.  I purposely waited a few days to respond to your email because I was waiting for the buzz to subside — I knew it couldn’t last — so I could think clearly about my impressions of the workshop and the lessons I learned there.

You’re right that I did give it my all, because I wanted to practice the lessons and be able to get direct feedback from you.  You are an excellent teacher and mentor and I was very impressed by your insight and judgement, your amazing ability to instantly recall images that demonstrate your points and bring them up on the computer, and the substance and clarity with which you answered our questions!  You’re the real deal, Adam.

You’re also right in that I anticipated hearing the design concepts you teach in your videos and writings, but looking back over the weekend, it makes sense to first develop us and help us bring ourselves into our photography.  To concentrate on the design aspects first, before you know what you want to shoot, would lead to a frustrating experience.  That was clearly the most significant take away for me — the process of going from not knowing what to shoot, to having an idea I could work, to getting your artistic and technical feedback on my first images.  This processed changed my relationship to photography.  It’s the first time I’ve ever felt like an artist. 

It was without a doubt the most transformational photography instruction I’ve ever had and it could never have come from an article, book, blog, or YouTube video.  Your workshop provided that invaluable experience!

I enjoyed the pace and rhythm of the workshop, too.  You’re very disciplined and focused, but you guided us in a relaxed manner and allowed the workshop to flow naturally without imposing a strict structure to it.  It was very well done.

Finally, I was impressed with the people you attract to your workshops.  It was so refreshing to get out of my own orbit and meet such accomplished people with interesting backgrounds and stories. Our lunches and dinners together were a highlight for me.  Please feel free to share my email with them as I’d like to keep in touch with everyone.   And please feel free to use/edit my comments for use as a testimonial.
Thanks again Adam!  It was a real pleasure.”

Sincerely,
–Greg Burke, Berlin 2014

Enjoy, relax, and shoot up a storm in Berlin © Adam Marelli

Shoot till you drop in Berlin © Adam Marelli

AM_LOGO-Lightroom-Small

]]>
http://www.adammarelliphoto.com/2015/04/berlin-photo-workshop-leica-store-miami-adam-marelli/feed/ 0
Matera Photography Workshop SOLD OUT http://www.adammarelliphoto.com/2015/04/matera-photography-workshop-sold-out/ http://www.adammarelliphoto.com/2015/04/matera-photography-workshop-sold-out/#comments Mon, 20 Apr 2015 19:37:44 +0000 adam http://www.adammarelliphoto.com/?p=7431 [more...]]]> Matera Photography Workshop

May 15 – 18, 2015
S O L D  O U T

Matera Photography Workshop © Adam Marelli

Matera Photography Workshop © Adam Marelli

The winter has finally lifted in New York.  It seemed like the snow might never stop.  And the change in weather means that travel season is upon us.  It is time to step out of the winter routine, dust off the camera, and shake away all of the excuses as to why you have not shot enough pictures in the last five months.  Fortunately, springtime means we can swap our wool for linen and hit the road.  This year will be the last year the workshop schedule looks the way it does.  2016 is going to be shaken up a bit and 2017 will see a handful of new locations.  So if you were thinking about coming to a workshop in any of the cities on the 2015 calendar, you might want to drop us a line.  Because they might not be happen again for a while.

Matera Photography Workshop © Adam Marelli

Matera Photography Workshop © Adam Marelli

The first stop will be Italy…Florence and Matera.  The former is one of Italy’s longest standing art destinations and the latter is an up and coming cultural hub backed by Unesco.  A favorite stop on the Grand Tour, Florence and Rome have battled for the top spot for centuries.  Florence is like a greatest hits album of Italy.  Everything is exquisite.  The food, the wine, the clothing, the art, the architecture…the list goes on.  Standing above the city at San Miniato al Monte, it is hard to believe how many innovative forces came out of such a small town.  Like the Italians say “Nella botte piccola, c’è il vino buono.” (The best wine comes from little bottles)

Mark, from our workshop last year.  Matera Photography Workshop © Adam Marelli

Mark, from our workshop last year. Matera Photography Workshop © Adam Marelli

Jan, at the end of a morning shoot last year. Matera Photography Workshop © Adam Marelli

Jan, at the end of a morning shoot last year. Matera Photography Workshop © Adam Marelli

On the other side of the country, Matera is gaining recognition as an unspoiled paradise of Italian-ness.  Matera is a laid back town, virtually free from the bustle of tourism.  The streets in the Sassi are paved in stone and you can wake up to the bells of cows grazing in the Parco Murgia (the national park across the valley.)  There are no flashy shopping districts or fancy restaurants.  It has a casual vibe that feels more like an elegant farmer than a Renaissance dandy.  It is, without question, one of my favorite cities in the world.  Matera is designed to be felt.  All of the analogies that travel writers devote to the pleasures of a woman can easily be applied to this city.  The way it smells, how it feels against your skin when you lean against her walls, and the most sensual pleasure of all, watching the colors cascade over every wall in the Sassi as night settles in.  It is a place to turn off your phone, forget about email, and live like we did years ago.  Look forward to seeing you there.

Matera Photography Workshop © Adam Marelli

Some pre-dinner wine at Sextantio (our hotel of choice) Matera Photography Workshop © Adam Marelli

Matera Photography Workshop © Adam Marelli

Matera Photography Workshop © Adam Marelli

Remaining Workshop Openings

  • Florence/Italy: 1 spot
  • Matera/Italy: SOLD OUT
  • London/England
  • Berlin/Germany
  • Prague/Czech Republic
  • Venice/Italy: SOLD OUT
  • Kyoto/Japan: SOLD OUT
  • N e w  A d d i t i o n: We added a second workshop in Kyoto/Japan Workshop: Sign up now theworkshop@adammarelliphoto.com

AM_LOGO-Lightroom-Small

Reviewing the treasures from our night shoot over a few glasses of wine at L'Arturo's. © Adam Marelli

Reviewing the treasures from our night shoot over a few glasses of wine at L’Arturo’s. © Adam Marelli

 

 

]]>
http://www.adammarelliphoto.com/2015/04/matera-photography-workshop-sold-out/feed/ 0
Do what you Love: Xyza Cruz Bacani http://www.adammarelliphoto.com/2015/04/do-what-you-love-xyza-cruz-bacani/ http://www.adammarelliphoto.com/2015/04/do-what-you-love-xyza-cruz-bacani/#comments Mon, 13 Apr 2015 16:09:18 +0000 adam http://www.adammarelliphoto.com/?p=7363 [more...]]]> Do what you Love 

Xyza Cruz Bacani

P U R P O S E  I N  L I F E

 

Do what you love: Xyza Cruz Bacani by Adam Marelli

Do what you love: Xyza Cruz Bacani by Adam Marelli

01

First I would like to congratulate you on the recent scholarship you won with the Magnum Foundation to attend NYU.  Could you tell us a little bit more about what this means to you and how it will impact your photography?

It means a lot because it will be my first (formal) education in photography. There is this tiny voice inside me that sometimes says people don’t take my  photography seriously because I am self taught, and I envy those who have a degree in photography. I still don’t know a lot about photography, especially technical stuff.

© Xyza Cruz Bacani

© Xyza Cruz Bacani

02

In the last few weeks, there have been a number of interviews about your scholarship, most of them with the heading “Domestic worker wins Magnum Scholarship…”  Why do you think people respond so strongly to your previous profession?

Maybe because not all domestic workers like me are given the chance to pursue their dreams. Being a domestic worker is not an easy job. We suffer from human rights abuses and are regarded poorly by society. With my story, somehow it inspires people that no matter what you do, where you from or who you are, your dreams are valid.

© Xyza Cruz Bacani

© Xyza Cruz Bacani

03

Could you tell us a bit about how and why you decided to pick up a camera?

I wanted to be a painter but I don’t have the skill or talent, so when I discovered photography, I was overjoyed because I realized that I can create with it.

© Xyza Cruz Bacani

© Xyza Cruz Bacani

04

What are some of your influences and how have they impacted your photography?

Jonathan Van Smit, Elliot Erwitt, Rick Rocamora, Sim Chi Yin to name a few.

© Xyza Cruz Bacani

© Xyza Cruz Bacani

05

How would you describe your photography?  Not just the genre, but why do you take pictures?

My personal photography is a visual diary of my feelings. My images usually reflect my emotions at that certain time. Photography for me is a need, more than just a want. If I am out shooting, I stop worrying. I am happy and I am free.

© Xyza Cruz Bacani

© Xyza Cruz Bacani

06

From your early pick up by the New York Times to the possibility of self education, it sounds like the Internet played a positive role in your development.  Usually the Internet is blamed for things, but in this case it seems to have brought you a connection to other people that led to success.  Could you talk about how the Internet was a resource for your photography?

I educate myself by watching and reading free stuff from Internet. I learned the basics from one of your video tutorials, Bridging the Gap. It connected me to great people. My closest friends, I met them through the Internet.

© Xyza Cruz Bacani

© Xyza Cruz Bacani

07

The choice to pursue photography is something that many people are afraid to do because they are not sure they can make money.  Did you encounter any resistance when you decided to be a photographer and how were you able to over come it?

When I asked my mom if I could buy a camera, she said, “It’s only for rich people.” I felt rebellious during those times, but I understand her. For people like us, the need to survive is greater than the need to do art. I’m slightly stubborn; when people say I can’t do it, I will do all my best to be able to do it. I like challenges.

© Xyza Cruz Bacani

© Xyza Cruz Bacani

08

While there have been a number of feature stories that look at “Domestic Workers,” you have a opportunity to come at the subject, not as an observer, but as an experienced worker and photographer.  How do you feel that your personal experience sets your work apart from the journalist trying to understand that world from the outside?

I am one of them, so they relate more. The images I took of them are more honest, more real because the intimacy is greater. There are no presumptions, they show me their real self, because they know that I know and experienced what they are going through.

© Xyza Cruz Bacani

© Xyza Cruz Bacani

09

Up until this point, attending a photography program has not been a practical option for you, what are you looking forward to with the prospect of spending all of your time dedicated to developing your craft?

I want to know all the stuff I need to know. I crave for education, I want to learn the business side of photography so I can find ways to support my family while doing what I love.

© Xyza Cruz Bacani

© Xyza Cruz Bacani

10

In other interviews you have said that you would like your photography to help people and that it would be useful to society.  Could you explain why this is important to you?

It gave me a purpose in life. One of the best things about living is when you realize what is your purpose, and I found mine. I want to serve people and the best way I can do that is by using my photography to raise awareness about issues I care about.  Awareness brings change and photography is a powerful tool to plant the seeds of awareness.

© Xyza Cruz Bacani

© Xyza Cruz Bacani

11

What are you most looking forward to when you come to New York to start the program?

I’m looking forward to meeting my co-fellows in the program, the people behind the Magnum Foundation and Susan Meisales. She is my superstar.

© Xyza Cruz Bacani

Portrait of Xyza Cruz Bacani © Xyza Cruz Bacani

Thank you Xyza!  We look forward to her arrival in New York City and welcoming her to the next steps in her career.  To see more of her work: http://www.xyzacruzbacani.com 

Do you know someone who took a chance on a dream and is doing what they love?  Drop us a line if you have a story that you would like to see featured…

AM_LOGO-Lightroom-Small

]]>
http://www.adammarelliphoto.com/2015/04/do-what-you-love-xyza-cruz-bacani/feed/ 4
Over a cup of tea: Origin Magazine http://www.adammarelliphoto.com/2015/04/over-a-cup-of-tea-origin-magazine/ http://www.adammarelliphoto.com/2015/04/over-a-cup-of-tea-origin-magazine/#comments Tue, 07 Apr 2015 20:33:52 +0000 adam http://www.adammarelliphoto.com/?p=7341 [more...]]]> Over a cup of Tea

Origin of Lost Ceremony

J  A  P  A  N

Ippodo has grown ceremonial green tea, called matcha, for over three hundred years. © Adam Marelli

Ippodo has grown ceremonial green tea, called matcha, for over three hundred years. © Adam Marelli

Adam’s Note:

When I returned from the first round of shooting Lost Ceremony in Japan, I wrote and illustrated an article for Origin Magazine that has not yet been shared online.  After three years, three exhibitions, and an upcoming book project, it is great to look back at where it all started.     

Outside of Kyoto lie the tea estates of Uji where some of the finest green teas are grown in Japan. © Adam Marelli

Outside Kyoto lie the tea estates of Uji where some of the finest green teas in Japan are grown. © Adam Marelli

“Tradition is dead in Japan,” Mariko whispers over a steaming bowl of ramen.  For the kimono maker, this is not a protest or resignation. It is simple fact.  For her, a woman who came of age in the 1980s, old Japan was lost after the war and will never return.  This puts her boyfriend, Eric Chevalier, in an interesting position.  He left his native France to live and work in Sakai City, where he is the apprentice and heir apparent to the Sasuke dynasty of metal workers. If he takes hold of the reins, Chevalier would be the 6th master at Sasuke and the first of European blood.  Chevalier’s master, Yasuhiro Hirakawa–a 62-year old officially designated a living national treasure by the Japanese government–says that Chevalier has what it takes to carry on the old traditions.

The highest grade tea leaves are steamed dry and ground into a fine powder, which will packed and sold to tea masters and enthusiasts. © Adam Marelli

The highest grade tea leaves are steamed dry and ground into a fine powder, which will packed and sold to tea masters and enthusiasts. © Adam Marelli

Industries like knife making and tea farming have been self-contained for over 1,000 years.  Ever since Japan opened its doors to the world, people have marvelled at the quiet refinements of its master-craftsmen. Their abilities are legendary, but not innate. Each Japanese apprentice must be guided by his or her master. In this way, a delicate thread runs through each dynasty.  It only takes one apathetic generation and the thread comes loose, condemning centuries of knowledge to oblivion.  

Kaikodo focused their efforts on the design of one tea caddy for over one hundred and fifty years. Fifth generation owner, Seiji Yaagi, still hand solders the canisters at his studio in Kyoto, while his son Takahiro handles the final assembly. © Adam Marelli

Kaikodo focused their efforts on the design of one tea caddy for over one hundred and fifty years. Fifth generation owner, Seiji Yagi, still hand solders the canisters at his studio in Kyoto, while his son Takahiro handles the final assembly. © Adam Marelli

Over bottomless cups of tea, masters and apprentices share their stories and reflections.  Breathing the same air and working side-by-side for at least ten years, they share more than just techniques. Following this lengthy and ancient education, the apprentice will remain under the guidance of the master until the elder craftsman retires, at which point the former student will take full advantage of the master’s counsel. When the master dies, his tea cup is placed on the ancestral altar and the one-time apprentice will stand alone.

Yasuhiro Hirakawa, the fifth generation national treasure, hand fits a knife at his studio in Sakai City. © Adam Marelli

Yasuhiro Hirakawa, the fifth generation national treasure, hand fits a knife at his studio in Sakai City. © Adam Marelli

The work of a craftsman is not glamorous, but there are advantages to the skills acquired across the centuries. Momotaro Jeans Katsu Watanabe’s family have over 150 years of fabric-making experience, all of which had been sustained by the insular Japanese market. Yet global opportunities have presented themselves to Momotaro. The recent explosion of high-end denim, with some pairs of jeans selling for $2,000, now represents 20% of Katsu’s business.  The four generations that preceded Katsu have given the Momotaro dynasty the know-how and machinery to produce a range of attractive options from ready made-jeans to hand-dyed indigo jeans woven on an antique wooden loom.  Master Uchida, Katsu’s head technician, lovingly tunes the old looms as if they were a concert piano.  Once he strikes the right chord, the fabric will build into a pristine sheet of raw denim, with its distinctive red and white selvedge. His apprentice stands by as Shigeru Uchida recalls his formative years.  “We could not ask questions…only watch, until the machine worked.”

Shushinkan Sake Brewery was established in 1751, but its modern facilities were constructed after an earthquake in recent years. © Adam Marelli

Shushinkan Sake Brewery was established in 1751, but its modern facilities were constructed after an earthquake in recent years. © Adam Marelli

A watchful eye like Uchida’s had always been an apprentice’s best tool, since it was forbidden to ask questions. In that way, the only path to knowledge was careful observation. Master-craftsmanship is the story of Japan, and in many ways reflects the way that Japanese society sees itself. Bamboo craftsman Miki-san explains that we cannot see the history of bamboo without the history of Japan.  Miki-san, generously inviting his guests to tea in his great-grandfather’s anteroom, shares his philosophy of the world through the metaphor–most familiar to him–of a bamboo lattice:

The sake is tasted by a master brewer at every stage of production to control the quality of the final product. © Adam Marelli

The sake is tasted by a master brewer at every stage of production to control the quality of the final product. © Adam Marelli

“Society is connected at the roots, our ancestors roots.  These are unseen.  From the forest floor, bamboo grows up and looks like we do on the streets of Kyoto.  But when it hit the sky, the shoots support each other, so intertwined that the canopy is as green as this tea.”

Miki-san selects premium bamboo from a forrest outside of Kyoto which will become the sacred fences of temple. © Adam Marelli

Miki-san selects premium bamboo from a forrest outside of Kyoto which will become the sacred fences of temples. © Adam Marelli

On that afternoon Miki-san points out a bamboo flower in his garden, a blossom which scientists say only emerge once every 100 years. Somewhere between mystery and miracle, the tea with Miki-san provides a sobering moment of clarity.

Zen monk Taka Kawami rakes the gardens of his family temple, Shunkoin located inside of the Myoshinji Temple complex. © Adam Marelli

Zen monk Taka Kawami rakes the gardens of his family temple, Shunkoin, located inside of the Myoshinji Temple complex. © Adam Marelli

The tea estates of the Uji region lie forty-five minutes by train from Kyoto. Famed throughout Japan as the provider of ceremonial tea, Uji’s Ippodo produces one of the finest powdered matcha teas in Japan.  Not all tea drinkers find themselves on tatami mats drinking matcha in traditional ceremonies, though: Ryozo Koyama–in charge of Ippodo’s daily operations–says he takes tea with his wife at a table just like everyone else.  Traditions in Japan can be surprisingly elastic.  Standing in front of the steaming machines which dry out the leaves, Ryozo explains that “Technology can be useful, but only if it serves the tea. The final product cannot be of any lesser quality because of production.”  Yet in the fields and warehouses, generations of father and son and husband and wife still pick, dry, and grind the teas.

Rev. Taka takes a moment between raking the stones of the rock garden to discuss his feeling that all practices need to be adaptable if they expect to survive multiple generations. © Adam Marelli

Rev. Taka takes a moment between raking the stones of the rock garden to discuss his feeling that all practices need to be adaptable if they expect to survive multiple generations. © Adam Marelli

Each tea estate in Uji will yield three harvests a year.  The very best leaves are fed into granite plates and then ground into a fine powder.  As a result, a fragrant electric green tea dust coats the grinding rooms. Once the matcha is processed it is quickly sealed and sent off for sale.  Ryozo does not have an ideal client.  He says, “It does not matter what clothes you wear or if you have a tea room. If you want to study the history of tea you can, but usually this is a small percentage of people. “

Yasuhiro takes lunch everyday with his apprentice and assistant.  In contrast to tradition Yasuhiro welcomes questions from the younger generation. © Adam Marelli

Yasuhiro takes lunch everyday with his apprentice and assistant. In contrast to tradition Yasuhiro welcomes questions from the younger generation. © Adam Marelli

Regardless of customer, no detail is overlooked when it comes to traditional teas. Inside the studio of Kaikado, Takahiro Yaagi maintains a close relationship with his friends and clients at Ippodo. The two dynasties form an interlocking Zen riddle, because without the other, their products are of no use.  For over 160 years, Yaagi’s family developed an air-tight case for tea that doesn’t rely on the aid of mechanical fasteners or rubber gaskets.  They are only able to produce sixty cases a week, with a four-month waiting list.  In spite of more general economic conditions, there is always a market for highly-specialized goods of outstanding quality. From tea to knives, Japan continues to set itself apart from imitators that can’t maintain the right combination between heritage, patience, and skill.

While he is capable of making swords, knives, and blades, Yasuhiro enjoys the unique challenge of bonsai scissors. © Adam Marelli

While he is capable of making swords, knives, and blades, Yasuhiro enjoys the unique challenge of bonsai scissors. © Adam Marelli

On a pleasant fall morning, Zen monk Takafumi Kawakami fixed the rock garden.  The wind shook orange leaves off of the trees, which gently fell onto the concentric rings of the rocks below. Kawakami needed to clear the garden before the temple opened at nine o’clock.  He laughed that mastery never looks as impressive in person, and powers up an electric leaf blower to help him with the task. Once the rocks are once again in order we share another cup of tea before meditation begins.  In a temple fourteen generations old, it becomes clear that Mariko the kimono maker’s claims are partially true.  Old Japan is changing.  Even the Zen monastery is adapting to its new life of cell phones and power tools.  But still Kawakami smiles.  The principles of tradition remain, waiting patiently for discovery inside a cup of tea.

The top of the tea bush is trimmed in October for the final harvest of the year. © Adam Marelli

The top of the tea bush is trimmed in October for the final harvest of the year. © Adam Marelli

AM_LOGO-Lightroom-Small

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

]]>
http://www.adammarelliphoto.com/2015/04/over-a-cup-of-tea-origin-magazine/feed/ 8
Join me at Adorama this Friday http://www.adammarelliphoto.com/2015/03/join-me-at-adorama-this-friday/ http://www.adammarelliphoto.com/2015/03/join-me-at-adorama-this-friday/#comments Tue, 31 Mar 2015 20:32:23 +0000 adam http://www.adammarelliphoto.com/?p=7332 [more...]]]>

Photo Brigade Podcast with Adam Marelli

S P O N S O R E D  B Y  A D O R A M A

Photo Brigade Podcast with Adam Marelli

Photo Brigade Podcast with Adam Marelli

Event Description

Join Robert Caplin and photographer  Adam Marelli for a LIVE video podcast recording at Adorama’s In-Store Event Space in NYC! They’ll be talking about his career as an artist, photographer, speaker, and workshop instructor.

TIME: 11:00am – 12:30pm

Address: Adorama is located at 42 West 18th Street, NYC.

We’re just a short walk from Union Square or the 6th Avenue – 14th Street subway station.

This event is open to the public to attend both in person at Adorama locally in NYC or online at thephotobrigade.com/LIVE. Anyone attending the podcast in person will be able to take advantage of a special 10% discount on many items throughout the store (certain restrictions apply).

AM_LOGO-Lightroom-Small

To read Adam Marelli’s feature articles on Photo Brigade check out the below:

How to find a model © Adam Marelli

How to find a model © Adam Marelli

How to find your next project © Adam Marelli 5 Things I learned in Japan © Adam Marelli In my bag © Adam Marelli

]]>
http://www.adammarelliphoto.com/2015/03/join-me-at-adorama-this-friday/feed/ 2